Great Stuff on the Writers’ Blogs, September 4 and 5, 2012

Wednesday already! How did that happen? Putting up that Critique Technique post yesterday must have thrown me off. Well, anyway, lots of terrific stuff to get to, so no more stalling!

As usually, we’ll start with matters of craft:

  • Gabriela Pereira (@DIYMFA) announces and begins a new series on DIY MFA called Creative Power Tools. Tool #1: Words gets things going. This is somewhat surprising post because it compares words to weapons. OK, we’ve heard that before, so we’ll see how this series develops. Gabriela also announces an upcoming project with super-publicist Dan Blank.
  • Speaking of “super,” super-agent Donald Maass (@DonMaass) is back on Writer Unboxed with a piece on why and how your characters need to change Without Delay. What’s interesting here is that his observations, as he notes, apply to all genres of fiction, “literary” or otherwise. The longer you delay having your characters change, he writes, even a little bit, the more likely it is your readers are going to get bored and look for something else to do.
  • Kim Weiland (@KMWeiland) looks at another thing that can chase readers away when she asks Is Your Scene Break a Lying, Cheating Fraud? Well, that’s certainly a provocative question! To be clear, it’s not the scene break itself that can be the problem, but what happens on either side of it. If the scene before the break ends with something dramatic but the scene that follows doesn’t live up to the expectations the drama placed in the reader’s mind, that’s where you get into bait-and-switch territory, which is what Kim helps you avoid.
  • We go back to Writer Unboxed for Therese Walsh’s (@ThereseWalsh)  Interview with Erika Robuck (@ErikaRobuck), author of the recent book Hemingway’s Girl. What I want to point you to is the portion of the interview,starting about 5 questions in, where Robuck discusses dialog, layers of the story, and publication. That’s not to say the first part of the interview, about research and Hemingway’s relationships, aren’t interesting, but I think the later parts are better.
  • We’ll close this section with 3 Free Photo Tools for Author Bloggers on Joel Friedlander’s (@JFBookman) The Book Designer blog. Friedlander introduces us to photopin.com, which helps you search through the gazillion photos that are posted on Flickr for the one(s) you really want. Then there’s freeonlinephotoeditor.com, which is, surprisingly enough, what it says it is. The last tool is one that exists in Google Image search: a way to use one image to search for others like it. Now that’s pretty cool. I haven’t tried any of these tools myself but they do sound like they’re worth a try.

OK, on to business stuff:

  • Patrick Icasas (@PatrickIcasas) writes the first of two guest blogs relating to freelance writing this week on Writer Beware! Blogs, this one on 7 Freelance Writing Scams and How to Fight Them. These scams have to do more with folks who are writing non-fiction pieces for hire than writing fiction “on spec,” but even fiction writers should give this post a look. You’re not immune to at least some of them.
  • On a MUCH happier note, Rachelle Gardner (@RachelleGardner) provides 6 Tips for Successful Networking. Rachelle’s writing about the in-person kind, the kind that leads to sweaty palms, stammering and blathering, and much general discomfort among writers. It doesn’t have to be that way, and Rachelle’s tips can ease the fear and pressure.
  • Finally, Kimberly Vargas writes in Radio Days on WordServe Water Cooler about her experiences with the online radio program, The Authors Show. Since I’m going to be doing a local radio interview myself tomorrow, this had some personal interest, but the point is that radio interviews are often a lot easier to get than other kinds of publicity. Local radio stations with talk segments or a talk format are always looking for content and not all shows are about politics. Online programs reach an even wider audience which can be, at the same time, more focused by topic or genre.

One more piece, in the “that’s interesting” category: Michael Swanwick has a short piece about what appears to be The Oldest Novel in the World & Its Genre. The book is Callirhoe by Chariton of Aphrodesias, and it was written around the first century A.D. Would you believe, it’s a romance novel? I guess since the author was from Aphrodesias, that shouldn’t be a surprise.

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