Great Stuff on the Writers’ Blogs, June 20, 2012

We’ll start with a warning that came in late yesterday.

  • Victoria Strauss (@victoriastrauss) reports on Writer Beware (R) Blogs that Author Solutions Introduces BookStub. The “loyalty card-size” BookStubs seem like a clever idea but what Author Solutions is charging is crazy-high–$1,199 for starters. No, that’s not 11 dollars and 99 cents. Yikes.
  • On a much brighter note, Kevin Kelly (@kevin2kelly) describes on The Technium how he’s using “crowd-funding” through Kickstarter (www.kickstarter.com) for User Pre-Funding of a project he’s working on. This isn’t for everyone but it is interesting.
  • Urban fantasy writer Suzanne Johnson (@Suzanne_Johnson) continues the Guide to Literary Agents blog series 7 Things I’ve Learned So Far by listing her 7 things, including, to my surprise, “Expect pushback from other authors, especially online,” referring not to negative reviews (which she addresses, too) but to the traditional vs. indie publishing kerfuffle.
  • Harvey Stanbrough (@hstanbrough) and Kim Weiland (@KMWeiland) both address clarity in writing:

That’s all for now.

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2 comments on “Great Stuff on the Writers’ Blogs, June 20, 2012

  1. Howdy Ross. Just to clarify, verisimilitude—the layering on of detail to intimate a deeper sense of reality—is a good thing and is a technique with which I strongly agree. That sort of specificity will indeed improve your story, especially because it enables the reader to become even more deeply engaged, surrounded as he is by the artifacts of your story’s world. I do not advocate that writers avoid adding pertinent detail even in the aforementioned layers. Rather, I recommend (strongly) against the unnecessary repetition of that detail. (Note: keywords above include “pertinent” and “unnecessary.”) And thanks, as always, for the nod!

    • Thanks, Harvey. I didn’t mean to suggest that you were contradicting Kim. What I meant was that you were coming at the matter from a different but complementary angle. You’re absolutely right: the right words, and only just enough of the right words, to get the image to our readers is what we should be striving for.

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